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Meet Tasmin, model and albinism advocate

We’d like to introduce you to Tasmin Luciana, model, sound engineer, university student and albinism advocate. One of Tasmin’s greatest achievements has been winning an Alternative Model of the Year Award.

Now she’s taking part in a free Zoom Q and A Zoom event to mark International Albinism Awareness Day and you’re all invited.

Date: Friday 12th June 2020

Time: 7pm West time (Australia), 9pm East time (Australia)

Guests: Contact us to reserve your space. Please let us know in advance any questions you’d like to ask. Email: Ryan.Honschooten@VisAbility.com.au

Cost: Free.

We want this event to be an online event like no other, where we truly celebrate the uniqueness of albinism so get your family involved as well. Feel free to create a party atmosphere in your own home, dress in your best outfit and bake some cupcakes. So enjoy some Friday night fun from the comfort of your own home.

Image shows Tasmin, who has albinism, smiling to camera with her white hair and white eyelashes
Tasmin has learnt to love herself and her unique identity

This is a free, fun event and anyone across Australia can participate. The more the merrier so spread the word.

This is your chance to ask Tasmin any questions you want, whether that’s about her struggles as a teenager, studying at university to be a sound engineer or her part-time career as a model. Find out what’s motivated and driven Tasmin to become the successful woman she is.


Tasmin’s journey

Tasmin from Sheffield in England is the only member of her family to have albinism. It meant she always stood out from her relatives because of her pale skin and light eyes.

In some ways it made it harder, because there was no one I knew like me. There wasn’t anyone saying ‘Oh look, I’ve got this as well, it’s not a big thing.’

Tasmin Luciana
Model, Sound Engineer and Albinism Advocate
Image shows Tasmin, who has albinism, with dark hair and dark eyebrows .
Tasmin is now studying sound engineering despite having limited sight

Tasmin’s younger years were hard as she was often bullied, and people would shout at her in the streets.

“Bullying completely destroyed my self-esteem. How can you tell your parents, ‘Oh yeah, I’m being bullied’ when you can’t physically see who’s actually doing it? I felt like some sort of albino freak,” she says.

“When you’re growing up there’s a lot of pressure to fit in to what everyone perceives as the norm and I didn’t so it was tough.”

A few years ago, Tasmin who used to have the surname Cressoti, featured on television to change people’s perceptions about albinism and to encourage people to embrace their own individuality.

Find out why Tasmin is trying to break down any stigmas surrounding albinism

Following her passion

Tasmin is now half way through a university degree in sound engineering in Yorkshire and is happy to takeon any challenges.

This year I was the front-of-house sound engineer for a Gay Pride event which attracted crowds of a thousand people. I don’t feel disadvantaged as my hearing is more attuned than someone with full sight.

Tasmin Luciana
Model, Sound Engineer and Albinism Advocate

And what are her tips to people who have limited sight?

“Go for your dreams, do what you want to do. Don’t feel the need to hide, be proud of who you are.”

If you are blind or have vision loss, don’t forget we offer a range of group therapy programs including those for young people. The programs are available through NDIS funding.

Email Ryan Honschooten, Children and Youth Services Officer if you’d like to book your free space on the Q and A event with Tasmin to mark International Albinism Awareness Day.

Email: Ryan.Honschooten@visability.com.au